Finding a Niche that you Love

When you first start in business you may think that you can deliver a variety of services to a wide range of people. And you may well be capable of that. But it isn’t going to help your business.

Knowing exactly where your strengths lie, what types of services or products you want to be offering and which niche you are targeting does not reduce your likelihood of making sales. Most likely it will help you to increase sales. Your marketing dollars can be fine tuned to appeal to exactly your niche and not wasted on non-niche bystanders who aren’t ready to buy.

So how do you decide exactly what your niche is and who you want to work with? 

Ask yourself these questions and see what you come up with:

1. Where are you at your happiest?

Do you prefer to work inside or outside? Or do you prefer a combination of working inside and outside. Is your happiness determined by the weather? Or is your happiness determined by what you can achieve or how you can serve your clients? 

Do you lean towards indoor or outdoor activities in your leisure time?

2. At what time of the day do you feel like you function best?

When do you have your most energy and when do you find it easiest to focus and really crank things out?

Knowing your peak operating time  can help you identify what type of niche might work well for you – I’ve never met a dairy owner who likes to sleep late! There might be a good reason for that…

3. Do you prefer to be active or studious and quiet?

Are you at your happiest when you are out doing things? Building, or walking or swimming or crreating? Do you prefer an active physically demanding activity?

Or do you gravitate towards work which allows you to sit quietly, either at a desk or other quiet location?

Or perhaps you prefer a bit of activity interspersed with periods of quiet reflection and analysis?

4. Where is your focus?

Do you like to understand the big picture or do you prefer having a detailed understanding of every single working part of a problem before you can develop a solution?

Do you like to create a vision for the future or do you prefer to focus on the present?

Knowing how your mind prefers to work can help you understand where your skills lie – we tend to gravitate to the things we do well.

Similarly, do you tend to see problems or solutions? Are you more optimistic or pessimistic?

5. Numbers, Words or Pictures?

When you’re seeking to understand something do your seek out the numbers, or a great description or need to see the problem before you can begin to solve it?

Are you prone to working up diagrams on the back of an envelope or a white board or are you more comfortable talking out the issues with a trusted friend or colleague?

6. Your ideal day

If you could create work that involved lots of ideal days, what would it look slike? Wouyld you be working with lots of people simultaneously in big groups or would you prefer to be interacting with one person at a time?

Or do you prefer to work alone and at a distance from people, only interacting when you absolutely have to?

You may well be one of those people that enjoys working with people to a certain degree but you also need some time on your own to solve problems, process information or prepare for future opportunities.

6. What's your favourite?

Who are your favourite clients and why? What makes them ideal to work with for you?And what type of work do you enjoy most when you are working with those clients or customers? If you haven’t started yet, think about the types of people you like to spend time with in your current working situation. 

Do you prefer days filled with meetings or days filled with outdoor activities that involve working among nature or somewhere else?

While you’re thinking about that, what type of work would you HATE doing? What is the one thing you can never see yourself taking up doing? What is it that you think you would hate? Why would you dislike it? This can be as much of a guide as knowing what you like – and a great key to making sure you avoid setting yourself up in a business you won’t love. Because if you don’t love it, the hard days will be impossible and the good days will only be bearable. Better to create a business for yourself doing mostly what you love. Then the hard days will be worth it and the good days will be great!

Once you’ve answered these questions, you will have some information about the types of work that you enjoy. Consider which activities give you energy and which ones leave you feeling drained and tired. In your past career, jobs or businesses, what things have you really enjoyed and what haven’t you enjoyed so much? Try things out – consider them as options for assessment and become a scientist in designing your own life.

If you’ve already started your business and feel that you’re not quite in your happy place, then consider how you might pivot your business to move towards how you would prefer to work. A small pivot may be all it might take to move your business from blah blah blah to yeehah! 

P.S.

Found a spelling or grammatical error in this post? Then contact me as soon as possible and let me know and I will offer you a free 30-minute review of your digital presence and some fresh ideas you can try out for free.

Get in Touch

If you’d like help getting your website up and running, then simply book a free strategy call and I can help you through the process by helping you to:

1. Define your target market.

2. Write great copy for your website that compels your customers to use your services.

3. Build you a website that can scale as your business grows.

4. Ensure your website is device compatible – by making sure your website works across a range of phones, tablets, screens and laptops.

5. Get your digital marketing journey started so you can focus on what you do best.

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